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The 2019 Columbia EE/CE MS Student Project Expo took place at the end of the Fall semester. Fifty teams presented projects ranging from a baby cradle that can monitor a baby’s behavior to a device that can track and take care of small plants.

Out of almost 20,000 nominations this year, Kord was selected based on his achievements that were reviewed by Forbes editors and expert industry judges.

Fifty teams presented projects ranging from a baby cradle that can monitor a baby’s behavior to a device that can track and take care of small plants.

Dr. Ashutosh Dutta who received his M.Phil. and PhD in Electrical Engineering at Columbia University has been named an IEEE Fellow and has been recognized for leadership in mobility management and security monitoring in mobile networks. Dutta completed his PhD (while working at Telcordia) and was advised by Professor Henning Schulzrinne. "I am very thankful for all the training, teaching, and mentoring that I received during my time at Columbia," said Dutta.

Professors Asaf CidonSuman Jana and Junfeng Yang have been awarded with Facebook's Systems for Machine Learning research award, for their proposal on building machine learning systems that co-trained not only for making better decisions, but also for meeting performance objectives.

James' research interests include optimal and robust control theory, mathematical optimization, and data privacy/sensitivity. In particular he is interested in designing distributed decision-making algorithms for cyber-physical systems. Such systems include everything from energy to the internet to transport and logistics.

Electrical engineering PhD student Min Chul Shin has been named a 2020 Facebook Fellow. He is a member of the Lipson Nanophotonics Group, led by Professor Michal Lipson, which focuses on nanophotonics and the investigation of the physics and applications of nanoscale structures that can slow down, trap, enhance and manipulate light.

Electrical engineering researcher will develop high-performance, flexible, biocompatible transistors

Researchers use atomically thin materials—1/100,000 the size of a human hair—to manipulate the phase of light without changing its amplitude, at extremely low power loss; could enable applications such as LIDAR, phased arrays, optical switching, and quantum and optical neural networks.

EE Professor John Kymissis and team first to demonstrate a robotic finger with a highly precise sense of touch over a complex, multicurved surface

The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded Xiaofan (Fred) Jiang, assistant professor of electrical engineering, with a CAREER Award, the most prestigious recognition the NSF gives to young researchers. Jiang will receive $500,000 to fund his project, “A Scalable Occupant-Driven Energy Optimization System for Commercial Buildings.”     

Tingjun Chen, a PhD candidate in electrical engineering, translates his expertise in developing algorithms and running simulations into real-world, next-gen Internet of Things technologies as part of COSMOS—a testbed for advanced wireless research headed by Professor Gil Zussman. From installing antennas on Columbia’s engineering building to implementing hardware for smart-city technologies, Chen plays a key role on the COSMOS team.

Hendon, who is an associate professor of electrical engineering, was cited for “developing optical imaging, spectroscopy, and processing tools for real time tracking and guidance of cardiac ablation therapy.” Her research is focused on biomedical optics and how optical imaging modalities can improve therapeutic procedures. She develops innovative medical imaging instruments that provide surgeons with a clear understanding of the tissue on which they are operating, including the heart, joints, and breast. She has worked on designing next-generation optical coherence tomography systems and integrated therapeutic catheters with near infrared spectroscopy, along with real-time processing algorithms to extract physiological information. In collaboration with colleagues at the Engineering School and at Columbia University Irving Medical Center, her group has developed integrative optics and therapeutic probes for improving the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. 

Columbia researchers design biocompatible ion-driven soft transistors that can perform real-time neurologically relevant computation and a mixed-conducting particulate composite that allows creation of electronic components out of a single material

In light of Covid-19, we are proud to share some positive news about some of our students and researchers in the Electrical Engineering Department at Columbia University who have recently accepted positions as tenure track faculty members.

Michal Lipson, Eugene Higgins Professor of Electrical Engineering has been named a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. She is among 276 artists, scholars, scientists, and leaders in the public, non-profit, and private sectors elected to the Academy, which was founded in 1780 by John Adams, John Hancock, and others who believed the new republic should honor exceptionally accomplished individuals and engage them in advancing the public good. Election to the Academy is a prestigious recognition of outstanding achievements in academia, the arts, business, government, and public affairs, and induction will take place at a ceremony in October.

Ethan Katz-Bassett, associate professor of electrical engineering, was awarded a year-long, $124,667 National Science Foundation RAPID grant to study the impact of people’s changes in behavior on the internet during COVID-19. The pandemic has led to unprecedented and ongoing changes to daily life, including shelter-in-place orders, widespread closing of businesses and schools, and work-from-home and school-from-home at previously unknown levels. These changes in behavior are placing extraordinary demands on the internet .

The SPIDERS project from Columbia Intelligent and Connected Systems Lab was awarded the Best Demo Award at the 19th ACM/IEEE Conference on Information Processing in Sensor Networks (IPSN ’20). The platform was demonstrated to hundreds of participants worldwide virtually.

The end of May is a time to celebrate and to recognize student achievement in the Department of Electrical Engineering. While in person events are not possible due to Covid-19, the Electrical Engineering department at Columbia University celebrated its students remotely. 

Mateus Corato-Zanarella has been awarded a 2020 Optics and Photonics Education Scholarship by SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics, for their potential contributions to the field of optics, photonics or related field.

We are proud to announce that one of our former EE PhD students, Negar Reiskarimian was selected to the receive the Morton B. Friedman Memorial Award. Her advisor was Prof. Harish Krishnaswamy in the EE department, and she focused on integrated non-reciprocal components for full-duplex wireless applications.

In their work, Ghaderi and his student provide causal scheduling algorithms for any traffic (arrival and deadline) process that evolves as an ``unknown’’ Markov chain (without knowing what packets with what deadlines arrive in future). Their algorithms significantly outperform greedy maximal scheduling policies. They have shown that it is possible to achieve a constant fraction of ``real-time’’ throughput region in any general network topology, and for any traffic Markov chain, without knowing the Markov chain. Their proposed randomized algorithms achieve at least 0.63 of optimal for collocated networks, and at least 0.5 of optimal for general networks.

Research team is developing an innovative patch device with active sensors to monitor and accelerate the wound healing process. “While wound bandages and dressings are one of the most common clinical tools for acute and chronic wound care, most are passive and cannot actively respond to variations in the wound environment,” says Shepard, a pioneer in bioelectronics. “Active sensing of the wound healing process would be a major advance for clinicians and patients alike.”

Fred Jiang, PhD, is an Assistant Professor in the Electrical Engineering Department at Columbia University and co-Chair of the Smart Cities Center in the Data Science Institute.

The NSF PAWR COSMOS testbed which is a collaborative effort involving Rutgers, Columbia, NYU, NYC, and several other partners has been accompanied by several  extremely impactful educational outreach activities. 

The NSF PAWR COSMOS testbed which is a collaborative effort involving Rutgers, Columbia, NYU, NYC, and several other partners has been accompanied by several  extremely impactful educational outreach activities.

Three University researchers have joined a $115 million DOE-funded center that will pioneer quantum technologies that could benefit national security, pharmaceutical development, and more.

The Optical Society (OSA) is excited to announce that Dr. Michal Lipson, Eugene Higgins Professor at Columbia University, USA, has been elected by OSA members to serve as the society’s 2021 Vice President.

EE Professors Lipson and Hendon have received a number of awards and honors this fall.

Incoming students learned about the EE/CE programs, career services, and the myriad of opportunities open to them.

Jiang and team propose to develop a technology to perform continuous skin temperature measurements at-scale and at-low-cost, enabling continuous fever screening of populations in and at entrances to their natural habitats, such as hospitals, schools, businesses, cafes, restaurants, mass transits, road and bridge toll/EasyPass booths, homes and workspaces, without disrupting their day-to-day activities. 

Lipson honored for her pioneering work in photonics.

Thanks to a generous Columbia Engineering alumni donor, 10 faculty teams (all ten teams listed here) have each won an $85,000 award to develop technology innovations for urban living in the face of COVID-19. 

Thanks to a generous Columbia Engineering alumni donor, 10 faculty teams have each won an $85,000 award to develop technology innovations for urban living in the face of COVID-19.

Profs Keren Bergman, Alex Gaeta, and Michal Lipson win funding for phase 2 of their project, Photonic Integrated Networked Energy-efficient Datacenters

This honor, which was established in 1874, recognizes the extraordinary achievements of scientists, engineers, and innovators across a wide range of disciplines.” 

Out of thousands of nominations this year, Robinson was selected based on his achievements that were reviewed by Forbes editors and expert industry judges.

Profs Keren Bergman, Alex Gaeta, and Michal Lipson win funding for phase 2 of their project, Photonic Integrated Networked Energy-efficient Datacenters.

Student club one of five U.S. teams participating in NASA’s STEM on Station initiative.

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